What is Healthy Diet?

Many people with serious illnesses would give anything for a single day of perfect health. After all, it’s only when you lose your health that you realize what you once had. To be healthy and make the most of what you’ve got, follow these recommendations.

1. Drink more water. Adult humans should drink 2-3 liters (or roughly eight 8-ounce glasses) of water per day. That is in addition to things like tea and coffee. Water keeps bodies at the correct temperature and removes toxins that are the inevitable result of metabolism and industrial life. You’ll be healthier automatically.

  • Water also clears your skin, helps your kidneys, helps to control your appetite, and keeps you energized. If being healthier, more wakeful, and having better skin isn’t motivation, what is?
  • In addition, it keeps you from drinking unhealthy beverages like soda and juice, which are high in calories. The body barely registers the intake of these unhealthy drinks and yet you still feel thirsty hundreds of calories later. If you need the taste, splash some lemon, lime, or 100% juice into your water. However, be sure that you eat plenty of calcium-rich foods, such as broccoli, to support healthy bones as you grow older.

2. Eat breakfast. A light, healthy breakfast is sufficient enough to reap the benefits of eating early. If it’s comprised of lean protein and whole grains, then it will keep you from gorging at lunch. Research shows that breakfast-skippers actually eat more! So, to curb your appetite, don’t skip the first meal of the day.

  • Instead of two chocolate doughnuts and a coffee that’s more cream than anything else, opt for eggs, fruit, and for a beverage, skimmed milk, fresh orange juice, or tea. The healthier your breakfast is, the more energized you’ll feel throughout the day and the more you won’t need to eat later in the day.

3.  Eat well throughout the day. If half of your plate is vegetables and fruit, you’re on the right track. Add in lean protein, low-fat dairy, and whole grains. Once a steady eating pattern has been established, your body will feel more comfortable. There may be a period of time when your body is wondering where the sugary foods went, but once you’re over the hump, you’ll feel better than ever.

  • Remember that not all fats are bad for you. Good fats can be found in oily fish like salmon and tuna, avocados, nuts, and olive oil. These are essential to a well-balanced diet. Read how to eat well for more tips.

4.Eat at the right times. A good time for a healthy, easy-to-digest evening meal is between 5 P.M. and 8 P.M.; it’s best to avoid late night snacks because they fill you with unnecessary calories and can disrupt your sleep. If you do need that midnight snack, stick to unsalted nuts, seeds, fruits, and veggies.

  • Snacking isn’t bad for you if you do it right. In fact, eating “constantly” can keep you from feeling deprived and going for that third piece of cheesecake when the cart rolls around. Just make sure it’s all in moderation.

5.Go a little meatless. In case you haven’t noticed, meat hasn’t played much of a role in what we’ve talked about so far. Being vegetarian is a good way to reduce your calorie intake and get loads of vitamins and minerals, but that being said, it can be done wrong. While it’s not the best idea to go fully vegetarian, most people do eat far too much meat. A good idea is to change the amount and types of meat you eat: swap pork chops for lean chicken; steak for tuna.

  • A high-fiber diet is easily had without meat. Fiber has been shown to lower your cholesterol, control your blood-sugar levels, improve your bowel health, and make you less likely to overeat. The recommended fiber intake is 30g a day for men and 21g for women; after the age of 50, this jumps up to 38g for men and 25g for women. Some good sources of fiber include fruits and vegetables (with the skin), whole grains, and legumes.

6.Read the labels. Processed foods get a bad rap, and often for good reason. However, you’ve got to choose your battles. That frozen bag of broccoli isn’t nearly as bad as that boxed mac and cheese. In short, avoid processed foods when you can — but if you can’t, read the labels and watch for added bad stuff: salt, sugar, and fat.

  • Food that stays on the shelves often has added sodium, words that end in -ose, and trans and saturated fats in the ingredient list. If you see these on the label (especially if they’re in high amounts), avoid them. You can find a healthier alternative elsewhere. It’s not worth it.
  • Just because it says it has no trans fat doesn’t actually mean it has no trans fat. Negligible amounts can be legally ignored — so if you see hydrogenated vegetable oil on the list, you’ve found one of the masked culprits.
Share Button