Monthly Archives: December 2014

Real Romance

Romance

Romance

I think a lot of people don’t understand what real romance is. Anyone can buy flowers and candy and jewelry, there is no love in that. The truly romantic things in life are those little things you do every day to show your care, and that you are thinking of them. It’s going out of your way to make them happy. The way you hold her hand when you know she is scared, or you save the lase piece of cake for him. The random text in the middle of the day, just to say” I love you ” or ” I miss you”. The way he stops to kiss you when he passes by.

It is dedicating her favorite song to her, and letting her eat your fries… and telling her she is beautiful, even when she is in her sweats..with her hair in a ponytail and no makeup. It is putting your favorite show on pause so she can tell you about her day, and laughing at his jokes even the really lame ones. It is slow dancing in the kitchen and kissing in the rain. Romance is not about buying, it is about giving.

True romance is in the gestures..

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THIS YEAR—2015

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Love what you see in the mirror

Make time for creativity

Never say no to adventure

Eat more green food

Send handwritten thank yous

Buy less, choose well

Be kind to strangers

Volunteer your time and skills

Give the present of presence

Learn from others

 

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Tesla shows just how far your Model S will go on a charge

Tesla model s

Tesla model s

So you’re fortunate enough to be shopping for a Tesla Model S, but you’re anxious about just how far the electric sedan’s variants will go on a full battery. How do you know you won’t be stranded on the roadside because you bought the wrong edition? The automaker clearly wants to put that range anxiety to rest. It just posted a detailed look at the driving range you’re likely to get from the Model S based on a slew of factors, including the equipment you use and how you drive. There’s a range estimator, too, if you want to see how each of those factors comes into play.

It’s no secret that the entry-level Model S 60 has the shortest range, while the 85D is the long-distance champ. Also, some of the efficiency tips for gas-powered cars still apply to varying degrees. You’ll lose about 3 percent of your range if you opt for the big 21-inch performance tires, and opening the windows or turning on the air conditioning is a no-no. Both your speed and consistency matter as well. You’ll eke a little extra mileage out of your ride if you cruise on the highway, and resisting the urge to mash the throttle will go a long way — you’ll go around 350 miles if you stick to 55MPH in a warm climate.

These figures are still somewhat optimistic, of course, and assume that you’re not coping with unpredictable elements like traffic or snow. However, this is a rare chance at seeing how well an EV copes with your driving conditions before you take the keys. And if you’re really, truly concerned about driving as far as possible in a Tesla, you can always try scoring a used Roadster.

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Happy New Year 2015! Save $5 off with coupon code:HNY2015

Dear malloom’s fans,
2015 is coming,happy new year 2015!
Save $5 off on malloom.com. Get $1 cash coupon after you like our facebook page on www.facebook.com/malloom, please send us a private message via facebook ,so that we can send you the cash coupon.
Happy New Year 2015!

Happy New Year 2015!

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The early development of the wristwatch

Queen Elizabeth receiving a "wristwatch" in 1571  From 1926 Gruen Guild advert

Queen Elizabeth receiving a “wristwatch” in 1571
From 1926 Gruen Guild advert

The Earliest Wristwatches

One of the earliest references to what we would perhaps now call a wristwatch, or at least an “arm watch” was the new year gift received by Queen Elizabeth from Robert Dudley, the Earl of Leicester, in 1571. It was a richly jewelled armlet, having “in the closing thearof a clocke, and in the forepart of the same a faire lozengie djamond without a foyle, hanging thearat a rounde juell fully garnished with dyamondes and a perle pendaunt.” What exactly this item was is not known because it no longer exists, but it clearly contained a spring driven clock or watch, and was intended to be worn on the arm, presumably somewhere where the watch would be easily visible, which would mean the forearm or wrist. The imaginative illustration shown here is taken from a 1926 Gruen Guild advert and shows Robert Dudley presenting the queen with her wristwatch.

The first wristwatches we have details of were small watches on bracelets (bracelet-watches or montres-bracelets) intended for ladies. An account book of Jaquet-Droz and Leschot of Geneva mentions in 1790, “a watch to be fixed to a bracelet.” When Eugène de Beauharnais married Princess Auguste-Amélie of Leuchtenbergin 1809, the Empress josephine presented her daughter-in-law with two bracelets, one containing a watch, the other a calendar. These were made in 1806 by the Parisian jeweller Nitot.

In 1810 the famous French watch maker Bréguet was comissioned by the Queen of Naples to make a wristwatch, which was completed in 1812. Patek Philippe made the key-winding lady’s bracelet watch shown on the left in 1868 for the Countess Koscowicz of Hungary.

Similar developments were taking place in Switzerland. In February 1889, Albert Bertholet of Bienne registered a claim, which was granted Swiss patent number CH 576 in April 1889, for a “Montre bracelet simplifiée” or simplified wristwatch, which implies that there must have previously been a more complicated wristwatch. Bertholet’s simplification was to do away with the winding and setting by crown and stem. The watch was wound by turning the bezel, which was geared directly to the mainspring barrel; to set the hands a gear, which engaged directly with the cannon pinion, was brought to a small slot in the side of the case so that it could be turned with a finger. M. Bertholet does not specify whether his montre bracelet was intended for men or for women but, given the name “bracelet watch” and the prevailing fashion at the time, we must suspect that if it was used – and I have never seen even a mention of such a watch – it would have been in ladies watches.

via The early development of the wristwatch.

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The advantages of having a SmartWatch

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Never miss a thing

Think of the noisiest places, the quietest places and the busiest places you have been. How many times have you missed an important call, message or other notification because you didn’t hear the tone or it wasn’t suitable to be checking your phone? A lot.

Your life. Your lifestyle

Your social network, your colleagues, family and friends know they can reach you because you miss nothing. Your phone can be in your bag or pocket or anywhere within 10 meters. Like a mini version of your smartphone, SmartWatch reflects what is happening in your world and lets you know.

Dedicated apps

Download apps for your smartphone lifestyle from Google Play. Control your music player from your wrist. Fitness apps are available for an active lifestyle.

SmartWatch works with most Android phones.

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State-Of-The-Art Watch?

A Navy fighter pilot walks into a bar and takes a seat next to a very attractive woman.
He gives her a quick glance then casually looks at his watch for a moment.
The woman notices this and asks, “Is your date running late?”
No,” he replies, “I just got this state-of-the-art watch, and I was just testing it.”
The intrigued woman says, “A state-of-the-art watch? What’s so special about it?”
He explains, “It uses alpha waves to talk to me telepathically.”
The lady says, “What’s it telling you now?”
“Well”, explains the pilot, “it says you’re not wearing any panties….”
The woman giggles and replies, “Well it must be broken, because I am wearing panties!”
The pilot taps his watch and says, “Damn thing’s an hour fast.”

 

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3 films to watch in 2015

Ex Machina 

Alex Garland was a novelist before he took up screenwriting. He then scripted Danny Boyle’s Sunshine and 28 Days Later, along with the film of Kazuo Ishiguro’s dystopian novel, Never Let Me Go. And now he delivers yet more philosophically knotty science fiction with his writer-directorial debut. Set in the very near future, Ex Machina stars Domhnall Gleeson as a naive computer programmer who visits a reclusive IT mogul, Oscar Isaac, and meets a walking, talking experiment in artificial intelligence: a gorgeous robot played by Alicia Vikander. But which is more human, the machine or its maker? Vikander, who also stars in Testament of Youth, should be an international star in a few months’ time. (UPI)

Far from the Madding Crowd

For nearly 50 years, John Schlesinger’s Far from the Madding Crowd has stood as the definitive big-screen treatment of Thomas Hardy’s passionate novel. But not, perhaps, for much longer. This new version is directed by Dogme 95 co-founder Thomas Vinterberg, whose last film, The Hunt, had a Hardy-ish air of grinding injustice. And it’s scripted by David Nicholls, whose best-selling novel, One Day, was inspired by a line from Hardy’s Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Carey Mulligan plays the proudly independent Bathsheba Everdene. Michael Sheen, Tom Sturridge and Matthias Schoenaerts (Rust and Bone) are the three men in her life. (Fox Searchlight Pictures)

St James Place

At the moment it’s officially called Untitled Cold War Spy Thriller, and St James Place is just its working title. But whatever name it ends up with, Steven Spielberg’s new film should be a treat. It stars Tom Hanks as the real-life lawyer who had to secure an American pilot’s return from the USSR after he was shot down in 1960. More excitingly, it’s the first film that Spielberg has directed since 2012’s Lincoln, and it’s scripted by the Coen brothers (whose Hollywood satire, Hail Caesar, is also in the pipeline). With any luck, it should combine the dapper 1960s globe-trotting of Spielberg’s Catch Me If You Can with the espionage hijinks of the Coens’ Burn After Reading. (Getty)

 

 

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iPhones and iPads made up over half of devices activated on Christmas

Apple’s still the king of Christmas when it comes to gadgets, but new holiday datareveals some intriguing new trends. iPhones and iPads accounted for over half (51 percent) of new devices activated during Christmas week, but Microsoft’s Lumia devices actually made a decent showing as well with the third place spot (5.8 percent of activations), according to mobile analytics firm Flurry. Samsung, naturally, came in second with 18 percent of activations, while Sony and LG just barely made it into the top four with under 2 percent each. Both Samsung and Android remain the top smartphone maker and platform overall, respectively, but the holidays seem to indicate that, for most consumers, if you want to get someone a nice gift you’re more likely to go Apple.

“…For every Samsung device that was activated, Apple activated 2.9 devices,” wrote Jarah Euston, VP of analytics and marketing at Flurry. “For every Microsoft Lumia device activated, Apple activated 8.8 devices.”

This year also saw a big jump in “phablet” activations (devices larger than 5.5 inches, but smaller than seven inches) during the holiday period. While Samsung’s Galaxy Note 4 assuredly had something to do with that, the equally large iPhone 6 Plus played an even bigger part: It was one of the top 5 devices activated during Christmas. Altogether, 13 percent of devices activated were phablets (compared to a measly 4 percent last year). Not surprisingly, the rise of phablets is also eating into large tablet activations, which fell from 17 percent in 2013 to 11 percent this year.

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Samsung’s new ‘ring’ speakers pipe sound in every direction

Samsung WAM6500 portable speaker

Samsung has tackled just about every kind of speaker you can imagine, but it hasn’t had an answer to hot-selling 360-degree speakers like the UE Boom. Well, that changes today: the Korean firm has unveiled the WAM6500 and WAM7500, its first compact one-piece speakers to promise room-filling sound. Both center around a “ring radiator” that pipes audio in every direction while supposedly striking a careful balance between bass and treble. If you ask us, though, they’re as much about the “premium” styling as anything else. The portable 6500 (above) looks like the kettle from an avant gardekitchen, while the tabletop-oriented 7500 (below) could easily double as a 31st-century desk lamp. Samsung hasn’t divulged pricing, but these fashion-forward designs will likely command a premium.

On top of this, the tech giant is expanding its Curved Soundbar range to accommodate the wider range of curved TVs it has in store. The 6000, 6500 and 8500 series join the 7500 line, and they’ll give you curvy audio for sets in sizes ranging from 45 to 78 inches. If you splurge on the 8500, you’ll also get a “wider” 9.1-channel surround sound effect courtesy of three extra speakers. There’s no word as to how much these new soundbars will cost, although history suggests that you’ll find out shortly before they ship.

Samsung WAM7500 speaker

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